Car Crashes are the Leading Cause of Workplace Deaths

workplace-deaths

Car crashes are the leading cause of death in the workplace.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 13 people per day lose their lives while doing their jobs. Car crashes are the leading cause of death in the workplace. Research has shown that “off-hours” automobile crashes cost employers nearly as much as “on-hours” crashes do, but the costs are carried differently.

The National Safety Council recently released their 2017 Injury Facts, where they explain the costs of deaths and injuries. The economic costs of motor vehicle deaths and injuries include wage and productivity losses, fringe benefits, medical expenses, costs of private and public insurance, property damage, and uninsured employer costs for crashes involving workers. Per death, the average economic cost averaged at $1,550,000.

In addition, the comprehensive costs include not only the economic costs, but also the value of lost quality of life that is associated with those deaths and injuries. The average cost per death including these costs totaled to $10,080,000. 

benefit-costs

Figure 2 from “Everybody Drives”

You may not think of your business as having a fleet of vehicles, or an army of drivers; but most likely you do. If you have employees, you have drivers.

The NSC study goes to show that employer costs stretch beyond the company door. Employers pay for injuries that occur to their employee on and off the job and to their dependents. You may not think of your business as having a fleet of vehicles, or an army of drivers; but most likely you do. If you have employees, you have drivers.

In 2013, motor vehicle crashes killed 1,620 people and injured an estimated 293,000 while they were working. As a result, over half of the injuries forced people to skip work. Motor vehicle crashes on and off the job cost employers $47.4 billion in 2013. Nearly half of this cost resulted from off-the-job injuries to workers and their dependents. The remainder resulted from on-the-job crashes.

on_off_injuries

Figure 3 from “Everybody Drives”

Off-the-job crashes are especially damaging. They make up 80% of employer crash-related health fringe benefit costs and 92% of employer crash-related health care costs. Most fatal crashes happen during off-the-job hours, particularly on weekends. The early hours on Sunday morning between midnight and 4 a.m. are especially dangerous. Throughout the week, more crashes occur in the early evening, evening, and late night/early morning hours than during the day.

The physical act of driving is a complex task, however, we tend to pass it off as a ritual process to get from point A to point B. 1 in every 5 vehicles on the road are being driven by someone who is driving on business. It is a sad fact that 1 in every 8 accidents involves someone driving on business. With these figures in mind, there is a huge measure of insecurity within the sectors of industry and commerce. If a key member of your staff was involved in an accident causing severe injury, how would that affect your business?

Companies with strong safety cultures take action by reducing risk in areas that protect their employees and the communities in which they operate

Driver safety programs can reduce collisions up to 63%. Providing a safer work environment is good business, resulting in lower insurance costs, fewer lost man-hours, reduced risk of losing key-employees, and reduction in corporate liability. For many of us, the last formal training in vehicle safety was likely high school. With our roads remaining as dangerous as ever, investing in your employees’ safety and implementing a driver safety program can certainly save your business from great loss.

“Companies with strong safety cultures take action by reducing risk in areas that protect their employees and the communities in which they operate. CEOs of leading companies committed to best practices in safety understand that safety is good business,” says the National Safety Council.

What is your company doing to minimize the risk to your drivers – both the “grey fleet” and the company-owned-vehicle drivers? Can you afford not to adopt a company-wide driver safety program?

hrs-fb-shop1Greatly reduce the risks faced by your employees and their families while protecting your company’s bottom line.

Implement a driver safety program in the workplace today.

Our course includes four modules:

Speeding
Distractions
Seat Belt Use
Drinking and Driving

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