Distracted Driving Comes with a “Hangover Effect”

surfer-2089817_640

Distracted driving can cause an experience similar to a “hangover effect.”

52% of drivers in 2011 reported owning a smartphone. Three years later, that number skyrocketed to 80%.

52% of drivers in 2011 reported owning a smartphone. Three years later, that number skyrocketed to 80%. While it’s obvious that texting and driving is a major distraction, it’s not so obvious how long that distraction actually lasts. AAA Foundation for Traffic & Safety conducted a study that found distracted driving causes an experience of “hangover effect,” making the brain stay distracted for up to 27 seconds after having used voice-to-text features to send text messages, make phone calls, or updating social media.

Even if you’re parked or at a stop light, the brain stays distracted once you begin moving. It is not on the task at hand, driving. This causes “inattention blindness,” where you’re looking at the road but not seeing what’s in front of you. That could mean pedestrians, other cars, traffic lights, etcetera.

Read the full report here.

hrs-fb-shop1Greatly reduce the risks faced by your employees and their families while protecting your company’s bottom line.

Implement a driver safety program in the workplace today.

Our course includes four modules:

Speeding
Distractions
Seat Belt Use
Drinking and Driving

Take this Course
Share